Diagnosis Bag: Diabetes

According to the Centers for Disease Control, from 1980 to 2014, the number of adults in the United States aged 18–79 with newly diagnosed diabetes more than tripled from 493,000 in 1980 to more than 1.4 million in 2014. From 1991 to 2009, the number of new cases of diabetes increased sharply from 573,000 to more than 1.7 million. However, from 2009 to 2014, the number of new cases decreased significantly to approximately 1.4 million. Especially in Type 2 Diabetes, sometimes one can manage the condition with lifestyle choices. To help in these cases, we have assembled a bag of resources that we hope are useful in choosing actions that will better your condition. It checks out for 6 weeks, so that you have it for enough time to digest the contents and maybe make some new habits, so when the doctor says your condition is “borderline, but we can try controlling it with lifestyle” you know that the library is in your corner. Below we have some local and internet resources to help you inform yourself further.

Diagnosis Bag: Diabetes

American Diabetes Association
American Diabetes Association
ATTN: Center for Information
1701 North Beauregard Street
Alexandria, VA 22311
Phone:1-800-DIABETES (1-800-342-2383)
Chat Help is also available by clicking on a link on the bottom right of the ADA page.
Here, also, is their Diabetes Information Center

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
Bethesda, MD 20892-2560
Telephone: 301-496-3583
Diabetes A to Z

Mayo Clinic is a good source of diabetes information, especially their pages on
Diabetes Care: 10 Ways to Avoid Diabetes Complications
and
Diabetes Nutrition: Eating Out When You Have Diabetes
There are hundreds of diabetes topics you can access from their site by simply typing “Diabetes” in the search bar.

MedlinePlus
A web resource put together by the National Library of Medicine
This is information you can trust
www.medlineplus.gov
Their Diabetes page

Portage District Library Health eResources
Databases brought to you by the Library of Michigan
(you may have to log in with your library card if you are not in the library)
These are carefully chosen online resources purchased to provide authoritative information to Michiganders.